Fitting in

My blog today is very closely linked to one or two other blogs already written on the site, but I still feel this needs to be addressed, as a blog in its own right.

How many of us living with a condition really feel that we fit into our lives with what we continually have to deal with, whether we deal with Depression, Bipolar, MS or Cerebral Palsy? These conditions constantly need addressing and re-addressing daily and takes a different kind of patience.

Obviously, I know a lot more about Cerebral Palsy, as that is what I deal with, but I do feel a balance has to be struck between the things we can do and the things we can’t, so that the things we can’t do are done by family members, but done in good grace.

How many family members will make you feel at ease and are prepared to take the task on themselves, so as not to make you feel bad or uncomfortable? My physical difficulties have always been put on the back burner, which is why I was so angry as a child.

But I believe a positive attitude, together with support and acceptance is exactly what we need to help us fit in and into the lives of others, with whom we share our lives with.


31 May, 2010

6 thoughts on “Fitting in

  1. Fitting in is very important. Most of my life I have felt like I was on the outside looking in. As a result I have low self esteem issues to this day. The one place where I felt good and happy was working for an organization that helped people with disabilities.

    I finally felt like I fitted in. I know during that time I was much happier, because I felt needed and important. It is very important to feel needed and valued. I would suggest to anyone that if you find a job you love, stick with it.

    It is important to find your passion in life.

    1. Fitting in, as we really just have to. Randy is very close to the mark but we don’t all live in a disabled world, as much as we may like to!

      I can see why some people are hurting bad, as sometimes we let them, but we have to cope in a very crazy world.

      Yesteryear people coped because they had no option and sadly we are feeling the results of what was sometimes very hurtful. We have to live in today’s society that mostly couldn’t give a damn!

      We all need to help each other across the difficult parts of life, but the only possible way to understand the hurting is to find people that really care.

      1. Thanks Mike. I didn’t cope because I didn’t have the emotional help whilst growing up. I felt I just existed.

        I withdrew emotionally early on so that I could deal with my emotional and physical difficulties. I was at my most happiest then.

    2. Thanks Randy. I agree it’s so important to find our passion in life. I am pleased you found yours. It doesn’t matter how long it takes as long as we find it.

      I also agree it’s important to feel needed and valued; but we need to fit into our own lives more than we need to fit into society, although that will also help.

  2. It is always hard to find family members who will help you accept your condition.

    At first, I had one family member who was jokingly poking fun at me. But that has stopped now that he sees that I am more normal with the Meds that I am taking.

    I hope you know that family members at home picking up the slack, are happy to do it for us.

    1. Thanks Maria. Yes, it’s a shame that you had the experiences with your family that you had.

      No-one should have to prove themselves before family will be more accepting.

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