Fad diets Part 2

This is the second part to my Fad diets blog, highlighting fad diet examples.

High fat

It is established that processed foods, which are full of empty carbohydrates and added sugars, are to be avoided for all sorts of health reasons such as obesity and diabetes. However, now health experts fear that this is about to spark a new diet fad that is also problematic, eating too much fat.

Everyone is talking about how healthy fats are, so people are starting to eat too much. We’re eating almonds and avocados and wonder why we’re gaining weight. The answer is simple. We’re eating too many calories compared to the amount of calories we burn.

We mustn’t fixate on increasing our fat intake. Instead, we must always try to achieve a balanced ratio of fat, protein and healthy carbohydrates so that we’re getting enough fat without overdoing it.

Raw Food

Raw food is not the worst fad diet to come along. In fact, there are many positive aspects of raw foods, namely that we’re eating real, whole foods. The theory behind it is that cooking destroys some of the vitamins, enzymes and other nutrients in food, so eating everything raw ensures that we get the nutritional package nature intended.

For some foods, this is true. For instance, raw broccoli has more cancer-fighting qualities than cooked broccoli, but this is not accurate for all foods. Tomatoes, for example increase in nutrients when they are cooked.

That is why it’s best to have a mix of raw and cooked foods. We don’t want to pass on a cooked vegetable just because it’s cooked and then eat no vegetables at all.

Conclusion

Taking both Fad diet blogs into consideration, although there will be some of us who struggle with food due to health issues and illness, taking out whole food groups isn’t the way forward, particularly as we’re taking out food groups that will provide us with the different vitamins and minerals we need to sustain us in our twilight years.

I think it is important to moderate what we eat, drink during the day, limit the amount of junk food we consume, eat healthier snacks, moderate portions sizes, take moderate exercise and work towards a more holistic and healthier lifestyle, including reducing the amount of alcohol we consume.


8 Sep, 2015

2 thoughts on “Fad diets Part 2

  1. I have really enjoyed ready these two blogs about fad diets.

    I have always viewed similar claims with scepticism. I appreciate that some people will genuinely have problems with certain foods but I agree with your blog that this is distinct from people who read about the latest diet fad and decide it’s for them.

    These sorts of diets seem to be discredited eventually, but they can do a lot of long-standing physical and emotional harm along the way.

    1. Thank you! Yes I feel they are too, years down the line when new understanding about the diet comes about.

      I couldn’t agree more. Any ‘fad diet’ can do lots of physical and emotional harm, particularly if we’re taking out whole food groups from our diets.

      Whilst I appreciate there are people like myself, who do genuinely struggle to eat and stay well, there are probably people who jump on the band waggon and follow diets for vanity and to look good.

      Those seem to be the wrong reasons for taking out food groups. On medical grounds, it is generally accepted we take particular foods out of our diet and this needs to happen. For other reasons, it may seem slightly irresponsible, particularly if it doesn’t need to happen.

      Perhaps there needs to be a level of acceptance on our parts that we’re actually okay as we are and that we must look after our health.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *