An apology & excuse

18 Jun 2016

Something inspirational:

“Never ruin an apology with an excuse.”

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

6 Responses to “An apology & excuse”

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  1. Tim 18. Jun, 2016 at 3:50 pm #

    Valid reasons or even excuses may not make up for our sins, but it helps to explain. After all, navigating the apology river isn’t easy, especially if we’re knee deep in wrong.

    • Ilana 18. Jun, 2016 at 4:44 pm #

      Thanks Tim. Yes, making excuses allow for more excuses, without taking control or responsibility for any mistakes.

      It’s important to explain our mistakes and that’s allowed, but to explain ourselves out of trouble without apologising I don’t think is acceptable. When we apologise and then come back in and retract our apology, is wrong; but it’s what so many of us do.

      We should never make excuses, because eventually people will come to see through those excuses.

  2. Maria Wilson 18. Jun, 2016 at 9:05 pm #

    Many people find it hard to apologize for their wrong doings.

    There are those especially that have a hard time accepting they are wrong and will try to explain themselves; and it may sound like excuses. It’s best to just apologize and accept that you are incorrect.

    • Ilana 18. Jun, 2016 at 10:51 pm #

      Thanks Maria, yes I couldn’t agree more. We tend to dig ourselves a bigger hole when we make excuses. We don’t seem to think about that at the time.

      We either work off our Ego; or it’s a pride thing. We couldn’t possibly be wrong.

  3. Brad 20. Jun, 2016 at 12:06 pm #

    An apology with an excuse or an explanation is not an apology. It should be unreserved and honest, otherwise I just don’t see the point.

    • Ilana 20. Jun, 2016 at 12:13 pm #

      Yes your first sentence sums up your response nicely. I think the majority of people come to struggle with accepting they’ve got something wrong and need to apologise. It’s often someone else’s problem first until they come to understand.

      For those of us who manage an apology, it’s often short lived when through more dialogue the apology is either retracted or an excuse applied.

      Children who apologise in childhood are more likely to apologise as adults, although I believe our environment is also a contributing factor and apologies either seem to be a thing of the past, or they’re met with an excuse.

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