Anxiety explained

It is accepted that a little bit of anxiety isn’t always bad, but too much is known to be detrimental to our health and can cause long term health problems.

If we deal with anxiety daily and don’t shift the mental thought patterns that produce anxiety, our anxiety will get worse therefore, it’s important we deal with the issues pertaining to what we deal with. Anxiety if left, can incorporate fear, such as phobias and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder to chronic worrying. They are all part of the anxiety scenario.

Anxiety can interfere with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and disturb sleep patterns, but first we must come to recognise their symptoms. Not everyone understands anxiety. Thoughts pertaining to anxiety, are known to be irrational or distorted that happens when the mind begins to play tricks, particularly in times of stress.

Perhaps, therefore the rationale behind a person’s thinking needs to change. Perhaps we need to refocus our perceptions and learn to use our intuition more, so that we channel a new way to think and that in turns should reduce the anxiety we feel.

We must come to understand other people’s thinking. Reading between the lines helps us understand more, so we’re able to become less anxious, because often another person’s anxiety will become ours. Listen out for the things people don’t say, instead of what they do.

It’s easy to get caught in the crossfire when the things people say, aren’t always what they mean. Sometimes we have to decipher what it is they mean and we can only do that by reading between the lines.


7 Dec, 2015

6 thoughts on “Anxiety explained

  1. I agree a little bit of anxiety can be a positive thing, as long as we find a place for it and it’s under control and we can channel it positively.

    As you say, when it controls us it is a real problem.

  2. I often let anxiety get the best of me. During stressful times, I start forming all these ideas in my head.

    Eventually I realised I just need to let things unfold by themselves. Stressing too much is not healthy both physically and emotionally.

    1. Thanks Maria. I completely resonate with everything you say in your response, but can’t help but think that a lot of what we put ourselves through when it comes to anxiety, includes other people too.

      It’s not to say we don’t have our own anxiety to deal with. Unfortunately, that’s life so we will always have some anxiety to deal with, but often a lot of what we deal with comes in from other people whether it’s extended family, our children, or problems with friends.

      I think if more of us learned to communicate better, those who are on the receiving end of their anxiety, would deal with their own anxieties better.

      Anxiety after a while becomes cumulative, particularly when it comes in from more than one place and that’s when it all becomes too difficult, with ideas forming in our heads, as you so eloquently point out and you’re right if left for too long will affect us emotionally and physically.

  3. Anxiety is very difficult to deal with. Mine is PTSD.

    Now it’s hard when I try an explain something to someone, it comes out jumbled. Then my anxiety will hit the roof. Through tons of therapy and family counseling with my kids, we’ve learned some great skills to help calm my mind and especially my children’s.

    1. Thanks Bonnie. I can resonate with you. Until someone walks a mile in our shoes they will never understand what neurologically, emotionally and physically we go through.

      I can also understand your frustrations. When you want to say something and the words simply don’t come out in the way you want. That will always impact our ability to communicate.

      That said it’s not something you can change, but something others can come to understand, as long as they take the time. The problem is they don’t seem to. People seem to live with less tolerance and little time for other people.

      I still believe though, that if people took more time to come to understand other people’s plights, we would have less anxiety to deal with, because others would come to empathise more.

      Although we can’t lessen anxiety completely, we can reduce it when other people come to understand.

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