My Pre-disposition

It’s true that we can be predisposed to certain diseases. That we can change our lives so that we don’t inherit something that someone in our family has, but what about something that you have because someone else made an error of judgment, in other words a mistake.

My Cerebral Palsy wasn’t a freak of nature from birth. I know that now. I developed normally in the womb, before I was born the younger twin and weighing more than my twin at birth, one hour after her. It was an accident waiting to happen, but in my case it didn’t have to happen.

I am now looking at what I deal with and questioning whether some of what I deal with is because of a predisposition of problems associated with Cerebral Palsy.  Take Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Having dysfunctional bowel problems as a child probably has a lot to do with me having it now, but I am also of the opinion that it goes with the territory because I have Cerebral Palsy too.

What about my future with Cerebral Palsy?

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy means I could potentially be looking at Arthritis and Osteoporosis without a doubt and that would be something that I may have to deal with in the future. Now I have to spend my life keeping myself as healthy and as fit as I can, mentally, physically and nutritionally, in the hope that I don’t go on to inherit either of these conditions.

Does that make it a predisposition?

Yes it does, because both these conditions are linked to what I deal with and not through an unhealthy lifestyle I might have chosen for myself.

I cannot change the mistake of what someone else failed to stop, I can only change my mindset, something I’m still working on through my blogs.


23 Sep, 2010

8 thoughts on “My Pre-disposition

  1. You are lucky. Arthritis hit me the year I turned 40. My doctor told my parents it was a real possibility because of the CP and all the operations I had growing up. I had 5 in total. Thankfully I am much better than the doctors thought I would be when they started fixing the damaged caused by the CP at the early age of 3.

    1. I understand you… I’m completely sure though that it was because of your CP and your operations that you have arthritis. I am under no illusions either, that this is something that I may have to deal with too. For now I will just do what I can to delay that time. We’ll have to see. Good luck Randy.

  2. I am pre-disposed to suffer with the arthritis and didn’t really have a good idea of just how bad it was until I went in for an operation for a torn rotator cuff.

    I was told after the surgery that there was so much growth on my shoulder they had to cut me open from front to rear on my shoulder and the surgery lasted 3 times as long as normal. That was just one joint and I feel all of the joints in the same shape.

    My grandfather and father also had and have the same situations. I look at it this way, at least I have arms and legs and are alive to cope with it. It can always be worse so I’m going to try and enjoy life despite these setbacks. Smile!!

  3. I guess I’m predisposed to several things due to diabetes. So far I’ve had retinopathy in both my eyes (I’m totally blind in my right eye for 22 years now) and more recently diagnosed with neuropathy. But like you say I can keep things at bay if I live a healthy lifestyle and eat the right foods.

    1. You are right when I think about it, there will be lots of people like ourselves predisposed to new conditions because of what we initially deal with, in my case CP and in your case diabetes. Until now I never really thought about it until I came to write about it.

  4. Yes you are right Ilana, but if you look at anybody that has been or had a very physically active life, most of them will have a predisposition to Arthritis or other medical problems without a disability. I was raised on a sheep farm and can remember the Shearers bending over constantly with no support to help the strain on their back. You can tell an ex-shearer a mile off as they are half bent-over with the they walk. Elderly Dairy farmers have exactly the same problems due to the continued strain on their back.

    Depending on the type and degree of our CP, is very similar to the above, as our bodies aren’t designed to twist and move unconventionally and the strains we put ourselves into just walking or even the way we stand, it really is the same in physics, as if we put the same strains on metal it will weaken and may even possibly brake.

    So yes we are at a higher degree/risk of having predisposition health problems like Arthritis, digestive, brain fatigue and even bowel problems later on in life… If we had this newer information when we were younger as we have no, we may have made better choices as with the therapists and new technology, to help keep our bodies more in-lined and better balanced and possibly not put the same strains and stress on ourselves now.

    I agree that with better medicine and homeopathic supplements we probably can help ourselves with some of these extra problems with our CP and live a better and more comfortable life than we do now. The generation before us with CP only had a life expectancy of around 60years. I was told this by a professor of Neurology 10 years ago at my Rehab Hospital.

    This would be of huge benefit to our medical practitioners if they could only keep both eyes open, for our future generations to come.

    1. Mike you are right. The problem I have, is that even with technology that is a lot more advanced than it used to be when we were children, it hasn’t moved on as far as cerebral palsy and what we deal with is concerned. There were probably thousands like me growing up in the 60’s in England who were missed for one reason or another, but things are clearly better now.

      I do believe in supplements and homeopathy, all of which I use, because like all conditions including CP you’re not just treating the condition, but an offshoot of something that is caused by the original condition, so the problem is easier to address.

      Cerebral Palsy definitely needs to be addressed though, so that we can age comfortably with all the relevant help, instead of being told to go and live our lives! Maybe in 25 years time that will happen, when someone in the medical field believes CP is finally important enough to address.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *