My Cerebral Palsy journey

As a follow on from my previous ‘Piecing my history together’ blog and having looked through my medical history again, I now have a fuller picture of my Cerebral Palsy.

My Neurological Consultant confirms that my MRI scan shows:

“An old stroke in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery and there is extensive damage to the right frontal lobe and a part of the right parietal lobe.”

These two lobes are part of the four that make up the Cerebral Cortex.  As these different hemispheres are interlinked it would be easy for most of those lobes to be affected, either directly or indirectly. Working through my symptoms, I find this certainly is what has happened to me. I am aware that because of my unique brain damage I struggle with each of these every day functions.

How it works

The brain is organised in three inter-connecting layers that work together and include the Central Core, the Limbic System and the Cerebral Cortex. Areas within these oversee all forms of conscious experience, including emotion, perception, thought, movement, balance, arousal, as well as many unconscious, cognitive and emotional processes, all of which I struggle with. In my case, these areas of the Cerebral Cortex aren’t receiving signals from the Central Core.

Each lobe has a different but related function. The Frontal Lobe deals with motor control and movement, the Perietal Lobe, deals with the main sensory receptor for the sense of touch and spatial interpretation and the Temporal Lobe deals with auditory perception, language comprehension and visual recognition.

As I continue to be affected, I’m not entirely sure why I chose to write this blog now. On an unconscious level after all of these years of not knowing, perhaps it’s finally time to put the record straight, for me to understand everything I’ve had to deal with, everything that’s happened to me and how much I continue to be affected by Cerebral Palsy and its many neurological symptoms.

However, hard those close to us struggle to come to terms with what they deal with, I believe there is still no excuse for ignoring something that is blatantly obvious and staring them in the face. This has been a massive struggle for me, one which no one should have to go through.

For me it’s the not knowing and often being judged for the things which others expect or think I should be able to do, which is worse than Cerebral Palsy itself. I still have a little way to go to fully understand my symptoms.


22 Dec, 2015

2 thoughts on “My Cerebral Palsy journey

  1. You have taken control over your life and you have freed yourself from the expectations of others through your writings, research and personal awareness. We know your courageous heart and no one can judge you by what they see on the surface, until they’ve placed themselves in your very shoes.

    I was once an inquisitive stranger, who became your friend through the power of your writings and the gentleness of your soul, and I’m still thanking you.

    1. Thanks Tim. Yes, I couldn’t agree more. Through my writing, I am free to think and feel as a free agent… to equate and put my experiences into context.

      The art of course is being able to carry that into real life and not care so much what other people think. Generally speaking, perhaps more of us should take this stance.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *