Codes of Conduct

All institutions and organisations have Codes of Conduct that they must adhere to. Governments too must set the standard as a leading example for us all to follow.

Codes of Conduct is an agreement on rules of behaviour for a group or organisation that sets the standard and outlining in principal the social norms and responsibilities that are expected and/or proper practices set for an individual. It outlines the attitudes and behaviour from individuals signed up to the code.

Codes of Conduct are voluntary, which sets in place values and rules of behaviour that guide how future decisions are made, that contributes to other people’s welfare, principles and in doing so respects the rights of others affected by its operation. It’s also an important part in establishing an inclusive culture, but it’s not a solution on its own.

A Code of Conduct is something we all work to in the work place and although it’s set out primarily for employees, employers work to the same code of conduct. A culture is created whereby rules are incorporated to include attitudes and behaviour. In the workplace their effective implementation must be part of a learning process that requires enforcement through training and continuous improvement.

A common code of conduct is written for employees, which informs employees of the company expectations. Codes of conduct are there to protect employees should there be a problem in the work place. It’s proved effective when employees feel comfortable enough to voice their concerns and know the company will respond with appropriate action.

No matter what we’re doing or whether we’re working as part of a team in the work place or we’re hanging out with family, it’s important we remember the Codes of Conduct rule.

How we behave is the catalyst for how society and the world functions, how our relationships will work, how others treat us and how we treat other people.


19 Feb, 2019

4 thoughts on “Codes of Conduct

  1. This is true. It seems that all norms of conduct have been shattered, which is really painful to see. But decency still matters, I’m going to tell people that.

    1. Thanks Tim. Yes, it is. I think you’re right decency still matters and with a little bit of thought we can all have that.

      A lot of how we are is down to our culture and beliefs and those make up our personalities that also include our childhood and environment.

      But from my own experiences and through my own story I have proved that we can change. We just have to want to.

  2. If only we all lived by a code of conduct that involved selflessness, respect and compassion.

    That might address some of the mess we have got ourselves into.

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