What we’re told

What people want to tell us is often what we’re told, but for those of us who instinctively know that what we’re being told doesn’t add up, it can make those circumstances rather awkward.

It’s usually a little white lie that gets us off the hook with no repercussions and for the most part it’s completely harmless. So how do we deal with those who feel it’s acceptable to tell us what they want us to hear, even though that what they’re saying is a fabrication of what’s really going on?

Although it doesn’t put those who do it in a good light, perhaps we need to understand the circumstances behind why. When we understand why, we will choose not to take what they say personally, because usually what’s being told is not directed at us. It is usually directed at themselves.

Although fabricating stories isn’t always right, there may sometimes be a hint of justification in those circumstances, depending on the circumstances. If more of us were better and more flexible in our approach, perhaps others wouldn’t feel the need to go to the lengths they do to fabricate such stories.

Unfortunately, fabricating any story can turn into black lies depending on what they are, but it’s not something we should want to continue. We should be straight with everyone.


17 Oct, 2015

4 thoughts on “What we’re told

  1. I’ve spent most of my life believing in and doing what I was told to do, with little to no regard of what I really wanted!

    My parents went well out of their way to reinforce their ideals, which were conflicting and completely opposite of what most normal parents tell their children. Even trying to think about my childhood brings up a volcano of emotions that I don’t like feeling.

    I find myself full of rage thinking about what my life should have been like and what I could have accomplished had they tried raising me in a ‘normal’ environment. People, once again, tell me how I should feel about my parents, when they didn’t go through the Hell that was my childhood.

    What I was told crippled me emotionally,and now I have to learn how to walk all over again, but how I choose to and not how everyone else thinks I should.

    1. All you can do is do what you’re doing Randy. I remember things being said when I was a child that when I look back I can see the reasoning behind what things were said, but not what should have been said.

      I know that our circumstances are often the reason why we choose to say and do things, that doesn’t make it right; it just makes it what it is. As long as we do what’s right, we can’t expect others to do the same, but if we take expectations away, we will never be disappointed.

      To some degree we put our parents on a pedestal thinking they know and will say the right things, but the reality is they know what they know and they’re not always capable. I am sure if we could come to understand fully and find an acceptance on that, we wouldn’t be so disillusioned.

      I too felt the same way as you, until I came to correct my thought patterns.

  2. The truth is, we live within a well organized system of lies. Its purpose is to maintain power and control in all areas of people activity, from religion to politics. Lies are woven into the very fabric of our existence.

    We pass our flawed beliefs easily from one person to another, over and over again; until what we believe sounds like the truth.

    1. Thanks Tim. You’re right. I think the majority of us buy into this. We come to believe what we believe because it’s easier, that way we don’t have to deal with, or change anything.

      I tend to work the opposite way and work with the universal truth. I believe if more of us were more transparent, we would relate to one another better. We conform to fit in and bend the rules to suit ourselves, rather than be individual and say what’s right, rather than what works for us.

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