Why we may fail

Just because we choose to block things out, doesn’t mean those things didn’t happen, in the same way failing to acknowledge another person’s success doesn’t mean that person isn’t successful.

Blocking it out doesn’t make it so. Sadly, as we continue to block things out we will not only fail to recognise other people’s success, but our potential success too. Perhaps society, family and our environment are partly to blame, because we’re conditioned to think a certain way.

Simply put, it’s important we’re happy for others even if we haven’t met with success ourselves. Perhaps, it’s not their success that’s putting us off. Another person’s success tends to reinforce our own upbringing and our lack of success.

Sometimes those thoughts are too ingrained to worry or concern ourselves about others. It seems to be a growing culture that we’re not always happy for another person if we haven’t managed to matched their success.

But taking that stance means we may fail, because that’s not how the universe expects us to act. It’s important we learn to be charitable towards other people’s success, for us to recoup some of our own.


16 Jan, 2018

4 thoughts on “Why we may fail

  1. Life has a way of backfiring when we overindulge in ourselves. So instead, we should think spiritual and encourage others to succeed; that helps goodness flow into every aspect of our lives.

    Certainly, each moral decision we make is an opportunity for our own progress.

    1. Thanks Tim. Ditto on your thoughts. ‘Each moral decision we make is an opportunity for our own progress and our spiritual growth.’ Yes.

      I believe being spiritual is the only way for us to encourage goodness to flow into every aspect of our lives.

      Spirituality encompasses all that is good. It’s about being concerned with the human spirit or soul, as opposed to material or physical things.

  2. Blocking things out was the only way I survived my childhood, but it also meant that I missed out on a lot of other good things, seeing as there were a few moments here and there that were good.

    I have also been very envious and resentful towards others, who seemed to have such an easy time in life, while I have always had to struggle and fight just to get what I needed, let alone anything that I ever wanted. My Mother also encouraged that kind of behavior and way of thinking, so it eventually became all that I knew.

    She also crippled me mentally by not allowing me to do a lot of things that parents usually teach their kids how to do, so I become paralyzed when confronted with a lot of things that people are able to do so easily.

    It’s called learned helplessness, which I now have to overcome at 49 years old. People so often take such simple things for granted.

    1. Thanks Randy. Yes, I get you. Had I not internalised things for myself, I will have had some of what you had to deal with.

      It’s always sad when we carry baggage into our adult lives without being able to let those go. You’re not alone. Do others have an easy time? I’m not sure we do, but I can understand your thinking.

      We tend to equate what we have to deal with and then assume others have it easier. We can go on to change our thinking, including how we see our lives, what other people have, what we haven’t had and how our parents’ parented us.

      I believe that through a change in our thinking and a different approach we can turn certain aspects of our lives around.

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